The Top Five Actions for Rapidly Becoming a Master Influencer in Your Profession or Organization, Part 3: Be a Valued Resource!

16.03.22 Last Master Influence Post part 3_edited-2

In this five-part series, we look at the actions needed to stand out in today’s crowded marketplace.

Action #3—Be a Valued Resource

I will never forget approaching an extraordinary artist and asking him to explain a bit of his technique. There was no one waiting and I had already purchased his art. I knew he wasn’t sensing that I was trying to steal his business, nor did I get the impression that he was especially shy or introverted. He just worked organically and, in a way, almost magically.  For him to put into words HOW he did what he did was well outside of his skill set.  He was not a teacher, a resource, or likely to ever become a mentor in his craft, even though he was immensely talented.

Similarly, you will find many such “artists” in the business world.  Others, who could effectively teach, are just too busy to pause from working on their projects to stop and share what they have learned with others in any deliberate way.  Yet, the need for such knowledge transfer is invaluable, never-ending.  This is where you come in!

Change in the workplace is moving at the speed of light. New systems, products and techniques are being developed daily that can greatly enhance our impact and productivity and need to be shared. If you are the one doing so, you can serve your profession profoundly, establish yourself as a thought leader, and make life-long friends, all at the same time.

Perhaps the biggest pushback to sharing a just-discovered resource or useful technique is that feeling we are not yet “good enough” to present our work or finding to others.  We may not believe we have achieved “pro status” in our market or organization. The irony is, this is precisely how one develops such credentials!

Consider the great coaches of professional sports.  Many of the very best coaches were not the best players.  What they have in common is not their former prowess on the ball field, but their ability to inspire, teach and coach.

While, of course, not everyone has the gifting to become an extraordinary teacher or coach,  all of us can use the power of becoming a valued resource to position ourselves prominently on the “radar” of our industry or organization, often without ever standing in front of anyone. Social media and email are the great, new, level playing fields where even introverts can thrive with consistent, strategic effort.  Here’s how…

How to become a powerful resource in six months:

  1. Document Everything You Learn. Did you stumble upon a time-saving technique, app, or resource today?  Have you just completed a big project at work? Save your article links, ah-ha’s, or project “lessons learned” in an app like Evernote so you don’t forget it. Then, commit to sharing your tip or list with at least one other person within the week.  Send them a LinkedIn message or email with your “FYI.” If it has been a while or you are close, you might even suggest to meeting up for coffee to share your finding.  Soon you will be in the habit of routinely sharing what you are learning in real time.  Do so consistently and in six months, people will begin to follow you online and reach out to you in other ways to see what you have to share next.

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You are invited! This Thursday, March 24th–Don’t Become The Walking Dead: Reboot Your Career In Six Months or Less–A Free Webinar

You can become a career zombie in no time at all.  Be a survivor!  Join us and learn all the latest strategies to reboot or refocus your career.

The Details:  Thursday, March 24th at 10:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. PST

Zombie Rising. A hand rising from the ground!

Note:  Space will be limited to 25 attendees to allow time for questions.

To register and for complete details:

CLICK HERE

The Top Five Actions for Rapidly Becoming a Master Influencer in Your Profession or Organization-Part 2

thank you with borderACTION #2: Master the Art of the Thank You

Two years ago I tweeted a direct thank you message to a famous author.  I had greatly enjoyed his book and used it with my mastermind group.  To my surprise, he responded within an hour.  This led to a back and forth conversation by email, then to a phone call, a podcast interview, and ultimately to a visit to his office to have lunch when I was speaking in his state.  Today, we are colleagues and connect by phone every so often to stay in touch.

Lest you think the above story is an anomaly, it has actually happens often in my work and has enriched my life in ways that I could not have imagined.  When I was just considering the speaking profession, I sent a thank you and inquiry to another author, now enjoying his heavenly reward, Og Mandino. Og wrote back and encouraged me to become a speaker, sharing connections that would change my life. Was his letter impactful?  Yes! That was 2,500 seminars ago.

Not only does it feel great to acknowledge those who have served you, thank you notes often have the result of bring the giver and the receiver together.  For best results, reach out in ways and in places where your communication has the best chance of not being lost in a sea of other emails or in a pile of unsolicited mail. Here are a few tips:

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The Top Five Actions for Rapidly Becoming a Master Influencer in Your Profession or Organization-Part 1

Searching for the right one Magnifying glass focusing on red man

In this five part series, we look at the actions needed to stand out in today’s crowded marketplace.

ACTION #1:  Master the Art of Following Up

Nothing speaks of excellence as much as being a person of your word.  How many times have you been promised that you will receive a call back, an email, or referral that never comes? It happens daily for most of us. While it is understandable that “things come up,” and people get distracted and forget, the good new is this means the bar in the marketplace has been set pretty low.  You will stand out strongly if you set up rituals and systems to remember.

  • —Promise less but always keep your promises.

It not unusual to be asked to do the unreasonable these days.  Common requests include invitations to excessive and interminable meetings, and urgent calls for detailed updates and check-ins.  Politely refuse them (I do so all the time) and negotiate a workable follow-up alternative on the spot.  Explain what you can’t do nicely, then immediately what you can, for example: “I am sorry I won’t be able to make that meeting or prepare that status report by tomorrow, etc., but I can ________.”  Need some encouragement in doing so?  Greg McKeown’s superb book Essentialism is a must-read for those who worry that they will soon be fired or not seen as a “team player” if they say “no” more often.

Once you have lightened your load, your next step is to follow up on what you have committed to do. Here’s how:

  • —Develop a system for never forgetting to follow-up.

Strategy 1: Use an App

Everyone has a different take on the best system, but the point is to have a system for following up.  The truth is any system will beat no system, every day!

There are lots of apps to help you stay on top of your follow-up.  I use Wunderlist.  It’s available for free for your PC or Mac and as an iPhone/Android app.

Wunderlist.com

Wunderlist.com

Whenever I have to remember to follow up with someone, I just drop a note to myself into Wunderlist, right then and there. It has a simple interface, is  free, and syncs to my smartphone and all my computers.

Strategy 2. Hold a Weekly Personal Business Meeting.

A Weekly Personal Business Meeting is the name I use for my simple, once-a-week, personal scheduling session.  The key is that you not only block out your work tasks but also time on the calendar for personal pursuits.  This includes your self-care, e.g., exercise times, doctor’s

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Six Months to Transforming Your Career and Personal Life: Hold a Weekly Personal Business Meeting

Person working on Computer with Telephone Coffee Mug on black wooden Table large Windows and green Garden View on Background

Like many early risers, popular executive coach, Ron Sharma, considers 5 to 8 a.m. every morning as “prime time or “the Golden Hours” and those who join him members of the esteemed “5 a.m. club.” Others prefer to work what has been coined “the second shift.”  They finish their regular work day, grab dinner, then jump on the computer for a couple more, often highly productive, late night hours.

Whether you are a night owl or an early morning riser, the significant take away is not when you do your best work. It is this: The more impact you wish to have in your career and personal life, the more you will need to set aside time for uninterrupted strategizing and planning, as well as activities that are mentally, physically and spiritually restorative.  You will also need to use this time to schedule the fourth restorative domain, the only one not accomplished in solitude- maintaining healthy social connections.

In fact, the more you grow into a leader, the more thinking time you will need to carve out to prioritize and strategize.

Here is the leader’s paradox: You cannot be your best alone but great leaders must carve out significant alone time.  As Michael Hyatt, productivity and leadership coach, said recently: “If your goals do not require a team, they are not big enough.”

The top business leaders I know all set aside specific time just for thinking. Some get away one day a month, a couple of days a quarter, and all certainly spend time developing yearly goals.  But, at the same time, they also all sit down in some fashion weekly to renew, review and strategize their next seven days.

My Biggest Temptation Will Likely Be Yours Too: Taking care of a few items before your meeting

If I take the bait and start my day just “taking care of a few items,” a hot email, a bill, a quick project, before my morning rituals, there is an excellent chance I will miss all or part of this critical start of my day.  And, my productivity will be significantly diminished even on days where I am working “non-stop.” I may be busy but am not doing the most strategic tasks.

The One Percent

Over the past six months, in preparation for focusing more on this topic in the new year, I began to informally pole each of my corporate seminar audience members asking the following simple question: How many of you have written goals?  On average, just 5% raised their hand.  In a group of medical professionals recently, not one hand out of 50 was raised.  Although, my sampling may be far from random, the conclusion is clear:  If you set written goals, you are instantly putting yourself in a very small minority of your peers. If you hold a WPBM you are certainly in the 1%!  The question is, does it matter?

The Verdict

The results are in and they are unequivocal:  The days I skip or have insufficient time for my personal planning meeting, I always pay for in terms of lowered productivity. And, nearly all leaders I know who make over half a million a year hold a WPBM in some form- not a bad neighborhood to move into yourself.

How to Host Your Own Weekly Personal Business Meeting (WPBM)

Your weekly meeting can be high tech or low tech.  There are any number of goal-setting and tracking systems you can follow.  But, like the classic game of Rock-Paper-Scissors, just as Paper always beats Rock and Scissors always beats Paper, meeting once a week with yourself to plan always beats no meeting, and any system you use always beats having no system at all.

Why have a personal business meeting?  To ensure that you take care of yourself and maximize your impact in service to others.

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Five Questions for a Strong End to 2015

15.11.18 Linkedin coffee image

It is often said, the best coaches ask the best questions. This principle works with what has been called self-coaching too. As we turn our attention to year’s end and the holidays, here are five questions to help you refocus and pursue what is most important to you. Grab a coffee and consider answering one question each day over the next few days, alone, or with a loved one or friend.

  1. YOU WITHOUT FEAR.

Question: If you suddenly woke up and had no fear or anxiety about the usual things that you worry about…

What would you do today? _______________

The rest of the year? ____________________

From this day on? ______________________

Click Here for Questions 2-5